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Section Name

Analytical Articles

Abstract

As research has well established the benefits to students of an engaged classroom, faculty are called to transform their classrooms into spaces focused on the learner (Petress, 2001). Though the basic course has traditionally been an engaged space, some formats of the basic course are limiting interaction. Researchers have argued that Student Response Systems (SRS) or “clickers” are one of the most promising technologies in transforming the classroom, particularly with the basic course, and offer venues for engagement for students particularly those who are most prone to avoid interaction. Nonetheless, many claims about these types of pedagogical tools have yet to be fully explored. This study looks to answer the question of how students within the basic course with high communication apprehension evaluate SRS, how they are limited in their participation in the classroom, how apprehension impacts their learning, and how these variables work together to explain more variance. Results indicate communication apprehension significantly predicts many of these variables and works with technology to mediate impact. Practical implications for the basic course, limitations of the study, and suggestions for future research are offered.