Title

Germination of Australian Channel Millet (Echinochloa turnerana (Domin) J.M. Black) Seeds. I. Dormancy in Relation to Light and Water

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1-1-1984

Publication Source

Functional Plant Biology

Abstract

Channel millet, a native to inland Australia, is recognized as a promising forage and grain crop for arid regions. In its native habitat germination occurs after the flood plains are inundated. Newly harvested seeds were dormant, but germinated after several months of storage or after disruption of enclosing structures. Intact, after-ripened seeds did not germinate in the dark, but dehulled seeds achieved high percentage germination in the dark. Secondary dormancy was induced by imbibing intact seeds in the dark and was broken by subsequent dry storage or by disruption of enclosing structures. Intact, after-ripened seeds that were subjected to wetting-drying cycles in the light germinated faster during the final wetting than did untreated seeds. High final germination percentage values were attained by both leached and unleached seeds. The light requirement may restrict germination to the rapidly drying surface layers of the soil and consequently restrict germination in its natural habitat to periods of flooding or prolonged rains when the surface soil is kept moist for extended periods.

Inclusive pages

395-408

ISBN/ISSN

1445-4408

Comments

Journal was formerly known as Australian Journal of Plant Physiology

Publisher

CSIRO Publishing

Volume

11

Issue

5

Peer Reviewed

yes