Title

Temperature-resolved Molecular Emission Spectroscopy: An Analytical Technique for Solid Materials

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1997

Publication Source

Analytical Chemistry

Abstract

Temperature-resolved molecular emission spectroscopy is described as a thermal analysis method for the analysis of solids and liquids. The technique uses an electrically heated graphite cup to decompose and/or vaporize the sample. The vapors are carried by a stream of argon into a cool hydrogen diffusion flame. Both the quantity and the nature of the decomposed species can be determined. The technique is particularly useful for the determination of sulfur, phosphorus, or nitrogen. Calibration curves for sulfur show the expected parabolic shape, and those for phosphorus are linear. The detection limit for elemental sulfur was determined to be approximately 50 ng. The evolution of sulfur is shown to be related to the decomposition temperature which is characteristic of the sulfur-containing species. Reproducibility of the decomposition temperatures is typically ±2%.

Inclusive pages

532–535

ISBN/ISSN

0003-2700

Comments

This work was conducted under Contract No. F33615-87-C- 2714 and F33615-93-C-2307 for the United States Air Force Aeropropulsion and Power Directorate, Wright Laboratory, Air Force Materiel Command, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH.

Publisher

American Chemical Society

Volume

69

Issue

3

Peer Reviewed

yes