Title

Influence of Three Different Soccer Cleat Configurations on Knee Joint Loading and Running Performance

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

5-2011

Publication Source

Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise

Abstract

Adequate traction is crucial for competitive soccer players to execute soccer-specific maneuvers. However, peak external knee abduction moments and peak tibial internal rotation moments during such moves have been shown to strain the ACL, with an additive effect at physiologic load levels, creating ACL strains exceeding the reported range of ACL rupture.

PURPOSE: To compare knee joint loads and muscle activation that might influence ACL injury risk between three soccer cleat configurations for highly-skilled, adult male soccer players completing a timed 26-meter slalom course with a change-of-direction maneuver at the apex of the course.

METHODS: This study was a double blind, randomized controlled trial that was conducted on turf with sand/crumb rubber infill. Three soccer cleat types were compared (conventional round cleats, round cleats with a novel disengaging mechanism, and a blade design) while ten highly skilled male soccer players ran a slalom course. The total length of the course was 26 meters and consisted of 6 cones with a 180-degree change of direction required on the force plate at the apex of the course. Kinematic recordings were performed at 120 Hz using a Vicon Motion system and software. Concurrently, ground reaction force (GRF) in vertical, anterior-posterior and medio-lateral direction were recorded at 1200 Hz with a 400 x 600 mm2 (Kistler) force plate. EMG activity was recorded using a wireless, 4- channel EMG unit (Noraxon Telemyo 2400 G2 with a DTS), according to kinetic data, at 1200 Hz.

RESULTS: There was a statistically significant within-group difference in knee abduction moments (p = 0.037; mean values 4.40, 2.88, and 2.92 for the rounded, disengaging and blade cleats, respectively). Knee internal rotation moments were not significantly different between cleat conditions (p = 0.216; mean values 4.43, 3.90, and 3.98 for the rounded, disengaging and blade cleats, respectively). Running speeds were not significantly different between cleat conditions (p = 0.367; mean values 11.03, 10.89, and 11.04 for the rounded, disengaging and blade cleats, respectively).

CONCLUSION: It appears one soccer cleat may reduce knee joint loading while improving running performance on a slalom course, but a larger sample size would be required to validate the current findings.

Inclusive pages

1466

ISBN/ISSN

0195-9131

Comments

Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise is the official journal of the American College of Sports Medicine.

Publisher

American College of Sports Medicine

Volume

43

Issue

5

Peer Reviewed

yes