Document Type

Article

Publication Date

9-2014

Publication Source

Educational Research Quarterly

Abstract

This study was conducted with students enrolled in a master’s degree program in educational administration at a private research university that offered all required courses in both online and in-class formats. The purposes were to determine (a) the extent to which online courses were selected, (b) the level of importance students placed on four common motives for taking online courses, and (c) levels of association between the importance of values and two demographic variables (employment level and years of teaching experience). The extent to which students took online courses varied considerably. Convenience and flexibility were the most important motives and instructional preference was the least important motive. Although associations between each motive and the two demographic variables were small, the correlation coefficients for convenience and teaching experience and for flexibility and teaching experience were slightly higher than the others.

Inclusive pages

27-42

ISBN/ISSN

0196-5042

Document Version

Published Version

Comments

Article included in repository with the permission of the publisher. Users may print, download, or email articles for individual, non-commercial use only.

Permission documentation is on file.

Publisher

Educational Research Quarterly

Volume

38

Issue

1

Peer Reviewed

yes