Document Type

Article

Publication Date

11-2014

Publication Source

School Administrator

Abstract

Literature comparing male and female superintendents rather consistently has reported differences in professional qualifications. Most notably, females have higher levels of professional experience, especially as teachers, before becoming a superintendent. Logically, authors studying this topic conclude that females usually must have superior credentials to enter the position. Two findings in AASA's latest decennial study of superintendents, one pertaining to teaching experience and the other to age upon entering the position, suggest the conclusion remains valid. In 2010, 28 percent of males and 13 percent of females had fewer than 6 years of teaching experience. In 2000, those figures were 41 percent and 20 percent, respectively. Thus, the percentages of superintendents with limited teaching experience dropped over the decade, but the ratio between males and females with limited teaching remained essentially the same. As for age, in 2010 only 13.5 percent of females versus 36 percent of males became first-time superintendents before the age of 41.

Inclusive pages

8

ISBN/ISSN

0036-6439

Document Version

Published Version

Comments

This piece is a recurring feature in School Administrator magazine. Archived issues are available on the magazine's website.

Publisher

AASA: The School Superintendents Association

Volume

71

Issue

10