Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2013

Publication Source

University of Dayton Law Review

Abstract

As expansive as the Supreme Court’s view of the First Amendment religion clauses has been, its jurisprudence has demonstrated that its rulings do not always achieve the outcomes desired by proponents of religious freedom.3 From the perspective of supporters of religious freedom, this realization lends credence to the preceding wry comment by Justice Scalia. This article details the Court’s inconsistent treatment of Christianity, and people of faith broadly, especially in educational settings. These inconsistent judicial outcomes run the risk of increasingly marginalizing matters of faith and conscience in the public square.4 As discussed in this article, disputes over the status of religious freedom in the United States continue to be litigated at a brisk pace even as Americans continue to remain among the most religious people in the Western World.5

Inclusive pages

363-400

ISBN/ISSN

0162-9174

Document Version

Published Version

Comments

This document is made available for download with the permission of the author and the University of Dayton Law Review.

Publisher

Western Newspaper Publishing

Volume

38

Issue

3

Peer Reviewed

yes