Document Type

Article

Publication Date

Spring 2011

Publication Source

Public Integrity

Abstract

Public networks typically function beyond the lines of the hierarchical authorities that hold bureaucracies accountable, as is shown here in the case of a business-dominant network that exhibited ethically questionable behaviors at the expense of its community credibility. Public networks can build external legitimacy by engaging in critical organization learning processes, much the way some nongovernmental organizations respond to a diversity of stakeholders.

Inclusive pages

163-180

ISBN/ISSN

1099-9922

Document Version

Postprint

Comments

From journal Public Integrity. The document available for download is the author's accepted manuscript, provided here in compliance with the publisher's self-archiving policy. Permission documentation is on file.

Some differences may exist between the manuscript and the published version; as such, researchers wishing to quote directly from this source are advised to consult the version of record.

Publisher

Taylor and Francis

Volume

13

Issue

2

Peer Reviewed

yes