Presenter/Author Information

Tiffany Hunsinger, University of DaytonFollow

Location

Room S2060, Curran Place; Link to session

Start Date

12-3-2021 4:00 PM

End Date

12-3-2021 5:30 PM

Keywords

Catholic Church, Fratelli Tutti, Pope Francis, Catholic Social Teaching

Abstract

On October 4, 2020, Pope Francis issued a letter to the world entitled Fratelli Tutti, On Fraternity and Social Friendship.

The document served as a culmination of the Church’s response to the global pandemic, as well as the more considerable perils of throwaway culture. This presentation will explore the specific response of the Catholic Church as it attempts to counter destructive boundaries and structure of its institution.

Pope Francis continues a tradition in pastoral response to the “signs of the times.” However, can the Church respond effectively in this current world?

Or do the needed changes surpass the capability of Church doctrine?

I will primarily use Fratelli Tutti and its highlighted aspects of Catholic Social Teaching to demonstrate the trajectory of the Catholic Church’s response to the current crisis, as well as human rights. What does it mean for a hierarchical leader, the Pope, to lead the institutional Church to welcome synods (a Church assembly for decisions) that voice those not heard from before now?

Pope Francis advocates for a Church as a field hospital, meaning he expects Christians to heal those around them rather than condemn them. Ideally, this will lead to a Church that welcomes rather than excludes, that works to protect human rights rather than discriminate. Hopefully, this will lead to a Church that reaches beyond the margins and boundaries. Pope Francis has shown us that it is time to stand in solidarity with the rest of the world.

Author/Speaker Biographical Statement(s)

Tiffany Hunsinger is a Ph.D. student in theology whose research focuses on contemporary American Catholic issues, particularly around politics and neoliberalism. Currently, she is working on coursework dealing with Evangelicalism and Christian Philosophy. She received her MA in Theology from University of Dayton and a BA in History and Comparative Literature from Purdue University. She currently works as a graduate assistant in the University of Dayton’s Religious Studies Department and teaches REL 103, An Introduction to Religion. She is the Co-Chair of the Marianist Social Justice Collaborative’s Immigration Working Group and is a member of Call to Action’s 2021 Re/Generator cohort.

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Dec 3rd, 4:00 PM Dec 3rd, 5:30 PM

Fratelli Tutti: Pope Francis and the Catholic Response to Human Rights

Room S2060, Curran Place; Link to session

On October 4, 2020, Pope Francis issued a letter to the world entitled Fratelli Tutti, On Fraternity and Social Friendship.

The document served as a culmination of the Church’s response to the global pandemic, as well as the more considerable perils of throwaway culture. This presentation will explore the specific response of the Catholic Church as it attempts to counter destructive boundaries and structure of its institution.

Pope Francis continues a tradition in pastoral response to the “signs of the times.” However, can the Church respond effectively in this current world?

Or do the needed changes surpass the capability of Church doctrine?

I will primarily use Fratelli Tutti and its highlighted aspects of Catholic Social Teaching to demonstrate the trajectory of the Catholic Church’s response to the current crisis, as well as human rights. What does it mean for a hierarchical leader, the Pope, to lead the institutional Church to welcome synods (a Church assembly for decisions) that voice those not heard from before now?

Pope Francis advocates for a Church as a field hospital, meaning he expects Christians to heal those around them rather than condemn them. Ideally, this will lead to a Church that welcomes rather than excludes, that works to protect human rights rather than discriminate. Hopefully, this will lead to a Church that reaches beyond the margins and boundaries. Pope Francis has shown us that it is time to stand in solidarity with the rest of the world.