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2020
Tuesday, January 7th
8:30 AM

Registration and Refreshments

University of Dayton

8:30 AM

Kennedy Union second-floor lounge

8:50 AM

Welcome, Announcements and Opening Blessing

Eric F. Spina, University of Dayton
Karen Velasquez, University of Dayton

8:50 AM

Kennedy Union ballroom

9:00 AM

Dialogue: Integrating Academic Affairs and Student Affairs in the Education of the Whole Person

Steve Herndon, University of Dayton
Corinne M. Daprano, University of Dayton

9:00 AM

Kennedy Union ballroom

In this moderated informal dialogue, the discussants will explore the education of the whole person from each of their perspectives and from an integrated one.

Following the dialogue, attendees are asked to select concurrent sessions that will allow them to further explore ideas and perspectives that came to mind during the dialogue.

9:50 AM

Presentation and Remarks Honoring the 20th Anniversary of the Ryan C. Harris Learning Teaching Center

University of Dayton

9:50 AM

Kennedy Union ballroom

10:30 AM

Advising the Whole Person: Perspectives on the Impact of Advising Relationships

Aaron Witherspoon, University of Dayton
Heather Parsons, University of Dayton
Heather Schieman, University of Dayton
Liz Mancini, University of Dayton
Stephen Wilhoit, University of Dayton
Cynthia Payne, University of Dayton
Jamie Riley, University of Dayton

Vocation, Advising, and Mentorship

10:30 AM

Kennedy Union 331

This session will focus on how academic advising can be a transformative experience for students. The Academic Advising Task Force (AATF) report affirmed the university’s position that academic advising is an experience that should be based on assisting students in finding their vocation. Panelists will speak about how they have had positive interactions and strategies while working with students.

Easing the Uncertainty: Discover Arts Students Find Clarity Through Core Program’s Interdisciplinary Learning

Marissa McCray, University of Dayton

Crossing Boundaries and Intersectional Learning

10:30 AM

Kennedy Union 312

Many students who begin their college career without a declared major often lack direction and struggle with the meaning of seemingly unrelated general education courses. Many also grapple with links between academic disciplines, careers, and broader life pursuits. This informative session presents research findings about how the Core Integrated Studies Program influenced Discover Arts students’ academic major selections and sense of vocation. The study examined a cohort of juniors who began Core as Discover Arts and who were interviewed one month after completing the program. Findings revealed the program’s high-impact pedagogy not only enabled wise academic major choices and vocational awareness, but the program’s tight-knit intellectual learning-living community also enhanced overall student development. The study’s implications suggest interdisciplinarity positions Discover Arts students for increased academic and vocational clarity by providing meaningful pathways that holistically equip students to lead engaged, purposeful lives.

The Marianist Educational Kaleidoscope

Savio D. Franco, University of Dayton

Vocation, Advising, and Mentorship

10:30 AM

Kennedy Union 310

In 2019, we celebrate 200 years of Marianist education – a tradition that has ignited tens of thousands of minds, hearts, and hands all over the world, in over 24 countries. The educational approach that has emerged from this tradition has philosophical depth and practical wisdom that offers rich context and direction for the scholarly adventures and professional formation of learners at Marianist universities today. Furthermore, the 2019 edition of Characteristics of Marianist Universities is just hot off the press and presents a fresh synthesis of the key emphases in this tradition. In this interactive presentation, participants will learn of a newly developed conversational backdrop titled "The Marianist Educational Kaleidoscope," which is a tool to help us visualize our own life journeys and visions for future work in light of (and brightened by) the Marianist charism – potentially discovering the Marianist within and finding new inspiration for the journey ahead.

The Modern Approach to Engage College Students in a Mentorship Program

Peter J. Titlebaum, University of Dayton
Maria C. Horrigan, University of Dayton

Vocation, Advising, and Mentorship

10:30 AM

Kennedy Union 207

This study addresses the mentorship relationship. Research exists on the benefits gained from a mentorship program. However, there is minimal literature examining the depth and development of the relationship that forms throughout the mentorship process. This pilot study investigated affiliates of UD in various capacities. UD Alumni graduates of the Sport Management program drafted an undergraduate senior in the Sport Management program, while those seniors also picked a student in a second-year class from the same program. The theory behind these pairings was to offer insights and knowledge the mentees do not currently have. Through a combination of structured surveys, assignments and mentor/mentee communication guidelines, the mentees got to know their mentor on a deeper level and learned how to build bridges to maintain the relationship beyond the first stage. The mentees recognized the expertise they have to offer in the relationship, ultimately balancing the contributions of each participant.

The Power of Collaboration: Cross-Boundary Contributions to Students’ Holistic Success

Dorothy Mensah-Aggrey, University of Dayton

Crossing Boundaries and Intersectional Learning

10:30 AM

Kennedy Union 311

Cross boundary and collaborative education have existed in the past. The University of Dayton’s attempt to reignite these concepts of education is in line with its Catholic Marianist identity. Education can be achieved in silos or collaboration of various entities on campus, both face-to-face and in current times, online as well. This presentation will offer ways in which the Institute for Pastoral Initiatives has in the past achieved collaboration with other departments on campus, and how this can be done across the board for maximum student development.

Keywords: Catholic, collaborate, develop, educate, students, whole person, online formation, e-seminar.

Vocational Reflection on Immersion: A Quest for Purpose

Maria Burkett, University of Dayton
Kelly Bohrer, University of Dayton
Mary Niebler, University of Dayton
Casetel Sweet, University of Dayton
Matthew Witenstein, University of Dayton

Vocation, Advising, and Mentorship

10:30 AM

Kennedy Union 222

A common thread among the collaborators for this presentation is working with transformative student immersion experiences. Through a vocational mini-grant, our team developed curriculum to enhance and develop students’ conceptions of vocation in light of their summer immersive experiences. All of the immersion programs (ETHOS, Center for Social Concern, Semester of Service, and Global Flyers India) provide intentional pre-reflection and learning experiences. Through conversation, we identified a need to bring more authentic reflection on vocation and to incorporate post-immersion reflection through community processing. In this workshop, participants will have the opportunity to engage in some of the reflection activities used, interact with and learn about the design of the curriculum, and take away a deeper appreciation of integrating vocation with experiential learning as part of a community of learners.

Work In Progress: Integrating Engineering Students’ Learning in Professional Communication

Patrick W. Thomas, University of Dayton
Jacob Cress, University of Dayton

Crossing Boundaries and Intersectional Learning

10:30 AM

Kennedy Union 211

This session stems from a current collaboration between faculty in the Departments of Engineering Management, Systems, & Technology and English in which we gather insights from industry partners to develop integrated professional communication activities for engineering curricula. Recognizing the centrality of communication both in technical fields and in developing students’ social, cultural, and professional worlds, our project aims to move beyond oversimplified “hard” (technical) and “soft” (humanistic) skill binaries to consider how a holistic approach to students’ professional development can be imbedded into STEM courses. To do so, we provide a demonstration of model assignments that integrate technical coursework and professional communication which draw upon interviews with industry partners and input from engineering faculty. In this demonstration, we seek consultation from attendees on ways to tailor assignments to particular course content and learning outcomes. We also ask attendees how they might evaluate students’ communication activities to convey technical content knowledge.

11:30 AM

Bringing Practical Wisdom to the Classroom

Steve Bein, University of Dayton
Mary-Kate Sableski, University of Dayton

Practical Wisdom

11:30 AM

Kennedy Union 312

This workshop is for faculty from any discipline who want to bring the Practical Wisdom SLO into their classes. The goal is to leave the session with a practical activity or lesson plan specific to your field and your students.

Building Bodies, Building Minds

Lis Regula, University of Dayton

Universal Learning and Learners

11:30 AM

Kennedy Union 211

Majors level Human Anatomy has long been taught as a gatekeeping class for medical schools of graduate schools, and has been highly professionalized due to this. It has also been constructed historically in a very hierarchical paradigm that has multiple oppressions supporting both the study of anatomy and the anatomy classroom. Besides these social issues around anatomy, there are the pedagogical issues of treating this material as something to just memorize and not understand that can cause problems for a student of anatomy. Disrupting these processes can be a very powerful force for anti-racism, anti-sexism, and hopefully even close some of the health out-comes gaps between cis, straight, able-bodied and middle class men and other people in society. This talk will present ways to bring in social justice, the arts, and physical activity to teach anatomy better and to help students learn anatomy at a level higher in Bloom’s taxonomy.

Calling All Students? Assessment of Students Enrolling in ETHOS Immersions, Semester of Service, and the Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program

Kelly Bohrer, University of Dayton
Malcolm Daniels, University of Dayton
Molly Malany Sayre, University of Dayton
Castel Sweet, University of Dayton

Assessment of Learning

11:30 AM

Kennedy Union 207

Nearly 150 students have enrolled in ETHOS Immersions, Semester of Service, and the Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program since the Spring 2018 semester, the beginning of the assessment period. It has not been clear whether these students are similar to other UD students in their respective majors or if they are different, perhaps in past experiences of community service or leadership positions, or in demographic factors. As educators, we are curious whether we are “preaching to the choir” of students who are already more involved in civic engagement than their peers, or if we are reaching more typical students.

In this session, presenters will discuss findings of comparisons of students enrolling in these community-engaged learning (CEL) courses to control groups. We will invite reflection on the role of CEL in holistic education and have a conversation about the implications of our findings on the university’s success in educating the whole person.

Conversations on 'The World in the Classroom and the Classroom in the World'

Laura Leming, University of Dayton
Andrea Zavakos, University of Dayton

Global and Intercultural Learning

11:30 AM

Kennedy Union 331

Global learning is such an important focus at UD but is sometimes difficult to operationalize. This conversation will focus on practical learnings and strategies from bringing the world into the classroom and for taking the classroom into the world. The three conversation leaders, from both CAS and SBA have had many opportunities to accompany UD students abroad and teach international students. They have also brought experiential learning into their classrooms here at UD that give students more practical knowledge and insight into being conscious of their call to global citizenship. While a starting point will be the leaders’ experiences in India, China, Ghana, Togo, Italy and at the Mexico/US border, we hope attendees will share their experiences and most effective practices for encouraging global citizenship. We also intend to create a list of resources and ideas that are shared to distribute after the session.

Social and Emotional Learning: Educating the Whole Person in the University Classroom

Colleen E. Gallagher, University of Dayton
Rachel M. B. Collopy, University of Dayton
Rochonda Nenonene, University of Dayton
Mary Kay Kelly, University of Dayton

Universal Learning and Learners

11:30 AM

Kennedy Union 222

Social-emotional competencies are associated with increases in college students’ engagement in learning, ability to handle stress, capacity for problem solving, retention, and academic achievement. Our department is in the third year of embedding the development of students’ social-emotional competencies throughout our degrees programs using the Social Emotional Dimensions of Teaching and Learning and Culturally Responsive Teaching framework. Unlike other models for social-emotional competence, this one is nested specifically within teaching and learning, takes culture into account, and is practical and actionable. The SEDTL/CRT framework was formulated with teacher preparation and K-12 learning in mind. Beyond teacher education, however, the framework can be broadly applied to enhance teaching and learning across various university disciplines. Participants will leave the session with an understanding of the social-emotional dimensions of teaching and learning and several strategies they can infuse into their own university teaching.

12:30 PM

Lunch and Dialogue

University of Dayton

12:30 PM

"Learning at UD: The Student Perspective" video, followed by dialogue with the Office of Experiential Learning and Student Success and Persistence Team

1:40 PM

Creating Inclusive Community at the University of Dayton

Castel Sweet, University of Dayton
Thomas Morgan, University of Dayton

Gender, Intersectionality, and Inclusivity

1:40 PM

Kennedy Union 310

The Creating Inclusive Community initiative is in its sixth year at UD. It was established to foster productive dialogue around social justice, intersectionality, and privilege in order to model the types of practices that could empower our community members to be agents of change and to help create sustainable change on campus. Over that time, five cohorts (and next semester a sixth) of students, staff, and faculty have taken a 15 week mini-course on privilege, diversity, and inclusion, and then attended a diversity and social justice. We would like to share our experiences over the last five years, and encourage attendees to join us in the work that we are doing to foster inclusive excellence and build community on campus. Developing our awareness and consciousness of social justice issues and needs on campus means that we will be prepared to engage and participate in making that change possible.

Developing Leaders for the Common Good

Madeline Weiler, University of Dayton
Brent Kondritz, University of Dayton

Leadership and the Common Good

1:40 PM

Kennedy Union 331

According to Jack Zenger, a leadership consultant and researcher, people are not receiving leadership training until the age of 42, even though the expectation is that they get leadership training in their 20's! UDCL is committed to closing this gap by providing timely leadership development to students, staff and faculty alike. While leadership development is often regarded as a being only for those with management status, The University of Dayton's Catholic Marianist mission calls for all of us to demonstrate the qualities of a great leader. In order to develop student leaders for the common good, faculty and staff must be willing to model these same leadership behaviors. The Center for Leadership is a campus resource committed to collaborating across the University to provide meaningful development opportunities to students, faculty, and staff.

Diverse Pedagogical Approaches to EL: Multidisciplinary Case Studies, Reflections, and Strategies

Karen Velasquez, University of Dayton
Theo J. Majka, University of Dayton

Experiential Learning: Diverse Pedagogical Approaches

1:40 PM

Kennedy Union 222

This session will be a hands-on workshop with faculty and staff authors of a forthcoming volume about experiential learning at UD edited by Karen Velasquez, director of experiential learning.

Participants will engage in concept-mapping of their educational journeys, including memorable experiential learning experiences in their lives. These will provide background for conversation about experiential learning themes in the edited collection, Diverse Pedagogical Approaches to EL: Multidisciplinary Case Studies, Reflections, and Strategies. Authors will create their own roadmaps about their EL chapters to share and discuss with the group. Presentation includes dialogue about doing and teaching EL with UD students.

Escape Rooms: Experiential Learning in the (French) College Classroom

Nicola Work, University of Dayton

Experiential Learning: Diverse Pedagogical Approaches

1:40 PM

Kennedy Union 207

Can you make a college class for example Francophone literature or French Conversation fun and relevant while being in a classroom? Can you engage students in hands-on activities that in addition to reinforcing the subject matter encourage critical thinking, teamwork, and communication skills? Absolutely. Say hello to Escape Rooms - group adventure games in which participants use elements in a locked room to solve riddles and puzzles with the goal of unlocking the room within a set amount of time. Escape games – modeled after Escape Rooms, but modified to not involve locking students into rooms, and widely adaptable to any higher education classroom – offer several educational benefits: Student-centered learning, where students make decisions and take initiatives; active participation and social, creative and physical engagement; and student reflection about and synthesis of the problem-solving process, to name but a few. As an educator who strives to be innovative and cutting-edge, I will illustrate why I decided to add Escape rooms to my teaching repertoire and how they can be beneficial to student learning. Attendees will see examples from my original Escape activities. A behind-the-scenes look will demonstrate step-by-step how to develop successful Escape games for any college class (and any content) and how to effectively implement them. An interactive question-and-answer session about Escape rooms in higher education will round out the presentation.

Gender, Intersectionality and Representation: Advancing Student Learning through Data Reporting

Lisa Borello, University of Dayton
Mary McLoughlin, University of Dayton
Josh Segalewitz, University of Dayton

Gender, Intersectionality, and Inclusivity

1:40 PM

Kennedy Union 312

This session focuses on the conceptualization and development of the inaugural Status of Women at the University of Dayton Report Card. Created by professional and student staff in the Women’s Center, the report card utilizes institutional data to track the representation of women across the UD workforce. While the project focuses on staff and faculty, it also serves as a powerful experiential learning opportunity for undergraduate student research assistants who were challenged with researching, designing and executing this project over the course of a year. In the process, students deepened their understanding of university life, developed new skills outside the classroom, and applied them to meet an institutional need. In exploring the intersections of identity and gendered differences in leadership attainment, the project team also sought to utilize data to advance the Marianist mission of the university. This session also explores lessons learned and future possibilities for the report card.

Hidden Gems: A Presentation of a Recent Chaminade Scholars Legacy Project (Class of 2019)

Maria Burkett, University of Dayton
Elizabeth Montgomery, University of Dayton
Sandra Yocum, University of Dayton

Vocation, Advising, and Mentorship

1:40 PM

Kennedy Union 211

“Hidden Gems” is a broader sharing of the Chaminade Scholars, class of 2019 cohort’s legacy project (funded by a VIT Vocation mini grant, 2018-19).

Session attendees can participate in a vocation “story walk” similar to an event in which Chaminade Scholars unveiled their “Hidden Gems”.

Prior to the walk Faculty and Staff connected with the CS Program will 1. share an overview of the CS curriculum and examples of experiential learning components

2. introduce the 2019 CS Legacy Project

Session Participants will experience “Hidden Gems” with heads, hands and hearts by reading some of the vocation stories, reflecting on the stories through written reflection/feedback, and through conversation(s) with other session participants

Inclusive Pedagogy in the Face of Implicit Bias: Critical Conversations on Educating the Whole Person in the STEM Disciplines

Sandra Furterer, University of Dayton
Yvonne Sun, University of Dayton
Kellie Schneider, University of Dayton
Allison Kinney, University of Dayton
Judit K. Beagle, University of Dayton

Gender, Intersectionality, and Inclusivity

1:40 PM

Kennedy Union 311

Percentages of women and underrepresented minorities within STEM faculty still lag behind the overall population percentages. This workshop will provide the opportunity to continue the conversations from last year’s LTC Forum, where we engaged in critical conversations related to patterns of implicit biases including: Prove-it-again, Tightrope, Maternal Wall, and Tug of War. After a brief overview of the implicit biases that impact diversity and inclusion, we will discuss challenges for STEM faculty and collectively develop strategies that can enhance inclusivity for Faculty in the STEM fields. These critical conversations will be held without repercussions and will help us to learn from each other with experiences facing similar barriers.

2:40 PM

Community Engagement and the Equity Compliance Office: Unpacking Your Role, Your Experiences, and Your Community

Jordyn Baker, University of Dayton
Tanya Pinkelton, University of Dayton

Diversity and Community

2:40 PM

Kennedy Union 222

When you think ECO, do you think “Ugh not them again?” Then, come talk to us! This presentation will engage participants to better understand the work of the Equity Compliance Office on campus while unpacking and demystifying stigma, cultural influences, and assumptions about sexual misconduct and bias-related incidents. Participants will have the opportunity to candidly discuss personal and cultural understandings of the Nondiscrimination and Anti-harassment Policy at UD and its impact on the campus community and their work.

Diversity and Social Justice Institutional Learning Goals

Castel Sweet, University of Dayton
Jivanto van Hemert, University of Dayton
Thomas Morgan, University of Dayton
Erin Gibbemeyer, University of Dayton
Matthew Witenstein, University of Dayton
Jason Combs, University of Dayton

Diversity and Community

2:40 PM

Kennedy Union 310

During the summer of 2019, the Common Academic Program, the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, and the College of Arts and Sciences convened a group of transdisciplinary faculty and staff to serve as Diversity and Social Justice Curriculum Fellows. As a group, our goal was to provide clarity regarding the Diversity and Social Justice Component of the Common Academic Program specifically, and the larger Institutional Learning Goals (ILGs) generally, that are connected to the experiences of all undergraduate students at this university. We would like to share the work we completed over the summer, and encourage attendees to join us in providing input on their experience with the Diversity and Social Justice CAP component and the Diversity Institutional Learning Goal. Incorporating the understanding and pursuit of diversity and social justice both curricularly and co-curricularly we will be able to better support our mission to educate the whole person.

Educating the Whole Person ... Including Their Biases: Student Responses to Black and White Professors

Daria-Yvonne Graham, University of Dayton
Leslie H. Picca, University of Dayton

Diversity and Community

2:40 PM

Kennedy Union 211

Two faculty teaching the same course, Racial & Ethnic Relations, using the same readings and lecture material, yet received very different student responses. The main difference? The race of the professor. In this session, we explore the implicit and explicit biases in the classroom, and the implications for these biases. We also examine what the University of Dayton can do to address racial bias in teaching assessment, from raising awareness (for hiring, promotion, and retention) to reconceptualizing how we assess teaching.

Seeing the Global Physical Context of Wholeness

Hamid Rafizadeh, University of Dayton

Mental Wellness and Physical Wholeness

2:40 PM

Kennedy Union 311

The pursuit of the whole person through models like 3H (head, heart, hands) my miss a critical physical aspect within which the wholeness develops and exists. One such aspect originates at the earth’s two versions. Humankind has a good understanding of one version and little if any of the second. Such lack of knowledge would adversely affect the development and maintenance of human wholeness. This proposal considers a workshop at the 2020 Learning and Teaching Forum to address this knowledge deficiency in University of Dayton’s community through participative knowledge processing and systems thinking.

Stop Telling Students to Leave Their Problems at the Door

Michael Key, University of Dayton

Mental Wellness and Physical Wholeness

2:40 PM

Kennedy Union 312

Kennedy Union XXX

Working with students who are on academic probation, I often hear that they feel there is nowhere for them to go in order for them to feel whole. They state instructors and supervisors says things like “leave your problems at the door” or “I’m not your therapist”. Our students internalize these messages by believing their identity as a learner is completely separate from their identity as a human being. I hope this presentation will illustrate that no instructor needs a counseling degree or to sit in a drum circle to effectively engage their students in the material they are teaching. Participants will see how parallel higher learning is to personal development. By allowing participants to bring their troubles into the session and naming them, I will demonstrate that their short, private reflection lays down the foundation for them to integrate what is being taught with both their personal and professional lives.

Teaching Fellows Mini-Reunion: Join Us and Share Your Insights

Susan Brown, University of Dayton
Rachel Normile, University of Dayton
Julie Simon, University of Dayton
Saverio Perugini, University of Dayton
Sam Wallace, University of Dayton
David Wright, University of Dayton

Teaching Fellows Gathering

2:40 PM

Kennedy Union 331

Teaching Fellows launched in 1986-87 and has seen 443 go through – not including this year’s 17 Fellows. This session is an opportunity for previous Teaching Fellows to come together and share significant insights into their teaching practices. Those who haven’t been in TF are welcome, also.

Whose Community? The Problem of Community as a Learning Goal at the University of Dayton

Steve Herndon, University of Dayton
Kelly S. Johnson, University of Dayton

Diversity and Community

2:40 PM

Kennedy Union 207

Community is at the core of the University’s Catholic and Marianist identity, and President Spina’s inaugural address on UD as a “university for the common good” offered a profound re-commitment to building and enhancing community on campus, in the broader Dayton region, and beyond. While community is vital to our identity, a careful look at our varied uses of and appeals to "community" actually reveals wide divergences in our understandings of it.The co-authors of a white paper on the Institutional Learning Goal of Community will present key findings and recommendations from their process, with particular focus on questions of justice, the meaning of “community” for the classroom, and the divide that exists between faculty and staff in the implementation of community. Attendees will prioritize, refine, and propose recommendations for better integration of the Learning Goal.