Document Type

Article

Publication Date

3-2019

Publication Source

Journal of Happiness Studies

Abstract

The present study examined how the Growth Motivation Index (GMI; J. J. Bauer et al., 2015) related to well-being and identity exploration in samples from the U.S., Japan, Guatemala, and India. The GMI has two facets. GMI-reflective measures the motive to cultivate critical self-reflection and intellectual development, whereas GMI-experiential measures the motive to cultivate personally meaningful activities and relationships. We expected and found that, when comparing the two GMI facets simultaneously, GMI-reflective predicted well-being in countries ranked as having collectivist but not individualist cultures, whereas GMI-experiential predicted well-being in countries ranked as having individualist but not collectivist cultures. GMI-reflective predicted identity exploration across cultures. Implications for growth motivation and culture are discussed.

ISBN/ISSN

1389-4978

Document Version

Postprint

Comments

The document available for download following the publisher's required embargo is the authors' accepted manuscript, provided in compliance with the publisher's policy on self-archiving. To read the version of record, use the DOI provided: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10902-019-00099-6

Permission documentation is on file.

Publisher

Springer Nature

Peer Reviewed

yes

Keywords

Growth motivation, well-being, eudaimonic growth, cross-cultural, identity exploration

Embargoed until Tuesday, March 31, 2020

Link to published version

Included in

Psychology Commons

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