Identity and Leadership: The Conceptualization of Black Female Undergraduate Development

Title

Identity and Leadership: The Conceptualization of Black Female Undergraduate Development

Authors

Presenter(s)

Rheja Taylor

Comments

This presentation was given live via Zoom at 6:10 p.m. (Eastern Time) on Wednesday, April 22, 2020.

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Description

As institutions continue to enroll and prepare Black female undergraduate students for professional success, intersectionality of identity is essential to understanding the foundation of leadership development and practice. This study explores the lived experiences of Black female Undergraduate students’ leadership development and identifies the impact intersectionality has on defining values, expectations and principles. This study aims to analyze major themes that arise from how Black female undergraduate students conceptualize their race and gender as it relates to defining their leadership philosophy with intent to inform mentors, advisors, and future theoretical practice on elevating and advocating spaces that are inclusive to intersectional difference. Using a qualitative approach, the common themes that arose from the research were evaluated and analyzed from an intensive one-hour interview exploring past leadership experiences, the impact of other leaders and personal challenges and anecdotes. The findings from this research answer two research questions (1) how students conceptualize the foundation of their leadership and (2) how intersectionality impacts leadership development. The results explore themes such as code switching, stereotypes and bias that have the power to both challenge and empower strength in Black female leadership.

Publication Date

4-22-2020

Project Designation

Graduate Research

Primary Advisor

Graham F. Hunter

Primary Advisor's Department

Counselor Education

Keywords

Stander Symposium Posters, School of Education and Health Sciences

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals

Reduced Inequalities; Gender Equality

Identity and Leadership: The Conceptualization of Black Female Undergraduate Development

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