Running Through My Life: An Autoethnographic Look at the Role of Sport and Media in the Development of Body Image in Female Athletes

Title

Running Through My Life: An Autoethnographic Look at the Role of Sport and Media in the Development of Body Image in Female Athletes

Authors

Presenter(s)

Katie Lynn Cantlin

Comments

This poster reflects research conducted as part of a course project designed to give students experience in the research process. Course: CMM 100

Files

Description

The main purpose of this autoethnographic study is to examine the influence of women’s beauty ideals on athletes’ body image and self-concept, with particular consideration of adolescent development. By using autoethnography to connect my personal experiences growing up as a distance runner with the current literature surrounding social judgment theory, the thin-ideal, and the feelings of overall dissatisfaction women in sports have about their bodies, this study calls for the reconsideration of what is considered beautiful in sports and society. Utilizing the reflexivity, vulnerability, and personal documentation involved in autoethnography, this paper breaks down various struggles young girls and adult women face from both societal ideals and the world of athletics. This piece emerged from a gender and communication course and notes the central role communication plays in establishing the norms surrounding women and athletes in society.

Publication Date

4-22-2021

Project Designation

Course Project

Primary Advisor

Jenn Freitag

Primary Advisor's Department

Communication

Keywords

Stander Symposium Posters, College of Arts and Sciences

Running Through My Life: An Autoethnographic Look at the Role of Sport and Media in the Development of Body Image in Female Athletes

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