Determining the association between gut microbiota and its metabolites with higher intestinal Immunoglobulin A response

Title

Determining the association between gut microbiota and its metabolites with higher intestinal Immunoglobulin A response

Authors

Presenter(s)

Tooba Shafeeque Ahmed Momin, Adam D. Moorman, Jessica Marie Sheldon

Comments

Presentation: 9:00 a.m.-10:15 a.m., Kennedy Union Ballroom

Files

Description

The gastrointestinal (GI) tract harbors an enormous amount of complex microbiota community and the GI-immune system is one of the largest immune organs in the body. Gut microbiota influences gut health and affects local and systemic immune response. The current study was designed to determine the specific gut microbiota and its metabolites responsible for higher intestinal immunoglobulin A (IgA) concentration. Twenty piglets (Scrofa domesticus) with an equal number of males and females were used in the study at one-week post-weaning. Fecal samples from these piglets were collected in sterile test tubes and analyzed for IgA concentration while part of the samples was stored at -80 °C for later analysis. Based on IgA concentration, piglets were divided into two groups, group 1 with lower IgA concentration (< 2.0 µg IgA/gram of feces) and group 2 with higher IgA concentration (>2.0 µg IgA/gram of feces). These groups were then analyzed for their differences in microbial metabolites and microbiota community using 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. Results indicated that higher IgA concentration was associated with significantly higher Bacteroidota and Desulfobacterota population and significantly lower Firmicutes and Firmicutes/ Bacteroidota ratio (p <0.05). Results also indicated that higher IgA was associated with low acetic acid, butyric acid, formic acid, isovaleric acid, and propionic acid. All these short-chain fatty acids have shown their effectiveness in reducing gut inflammation. Higher IgA was directly related to higher valeric acid concentration. Piglets with higher IgA also had significantly higher xylulose, tocopherol-alpha, glycine, adenine, pantothenic acid, xylitol, pimelic acid, palmitic acid, and alanine concentration in the gut (p<0.05). Higher IgA was associated with significantly lower tyramine, putrescine, phytosphingosine, beta-alanine, 4-aminobutyric acid concentration (p<0.05). Overall, the current study indicated that higher gut IgA had a direct relationship with lower Firmicutes/ Bacteroidota ratio and lower short-chain fatty acids.

Publication Date

4-20-2022

Project Designation

Independent Research

Primary Advisor

Mrigendra Rajput

Primary Advisor's Department

Biology

Keywords

Stander Symposium project, College of Arts and Sciences

Determining the association between gut microbiota and its metabolites with higher intestinal Immunoglobulin A response

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