It Makes Voices Louder: Why the Punishment of Free Speech is Counterintuitive

Title

It Makes Voices Louder: Why the Punishment of Free Speech is Counterintuitive

Authors

Presenter(s)

Caroline Lavin Herling

Comments

Presentation: 3:00 p.m.-4:15 p.m., Kennedy Union Ballroom

This project reflects research conducted as part of a course project designed to give students experience in the research process.

Course: THR 250

Files

Description

Diversity of thought is required for progress. However, the differing desired result of “progress” has proven to be an extreme point of contention between individuals and authorities. Of course, with the unbridled nature of free speech comes a spectrum of battling ethics, fallacies, and disparate perspectives of "truth". When authorities get involved to promote a singular viewpoint the diversity that paints the whole picture of the human experience is lost and people with the erased voices react. Ai WeiWei’s 1000 Years of Joys and Sorrows, public outrage over Florida's “Don’t Say Gay” bill, and Jennifer Rossuck’s study of censorship and banned books show that perspectives are recovered when the masses are inspired, specific media attention is earned, and public interest is sparked.

Publication Date

4-20-2022

Project Designation

Course Project

Primary Advisor

R. Darden Bradshaw, Michelle Hayford

Primary Advisor's Department

Theatre, Dance and Performance Technology

Keywords

Stander Symposium project, College of Arts and Sciences

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals

Reduced Inequalities

It Makes Voices Louder: Why the Punishment of Free Speech is Counterintuitive

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