Authors

Presenter(s)

Alexandra C Hall

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Description

College has traditionally been a time when students become more independent from their parents as they transition to adulthood. However, today’s college students seem to be increasingly closer to, and in some cases dependent on, their parents. The purpose of this qualitative, narrative study was to explore the influence that parental relationships have on undergraduate, traditional-aged college students at the University of Dayton (UD) in terms of their college experience and developmental transition to adulthood. The research question guiding the study asks, how do undergraduate, traditional-aged college seniors at UD describe their developmental journeys during their college years in the context of their parental relationships? To answer this question, qualitative data was collected via one on one, narrative interviews with a sample of six college students in their senior year at UD. The sample was obtained through the snowball sampling method. The findings in this study could help student affairs professionals better understand the relationship between college students and their parents, and how to best support students in navigating college life amidst these relationships. Findings could also help student affairs professionals recognize the role parents play in their college students' lives and how to best accommodate, include, and engage families in higher education for the benefit of the parents, the students, and the institution. Prevalent trends that were discovered in the data are presented and implications for future practice and research are addressed.

Publication Date

4-5-2017

Project Designation

Course Project - Graduate

Primary Advisor

Savio D Franco

Primary Advisor's Department

Counselor Education and Human Services

Keywords

Stander Symposium poster

From Children to Friends: The Influence of Parental Relationships on the Developmental Journeys of Undergraduate Students

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