Honors Theses

Author(s)

Erin Peiffer

Advisor

Joshua Heyne, Ph.D.

Department

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Publication Date

4-2017

Document Type

Honors Thesis

Abstract

More than 2 billion people in the world use biomass stoves for cooking and heating their homes. Due to incomplete combustion, toxic byproducts such as soot, nitrous oxides and carbon monoxide gasses form. These toxic substances contribute to pollution and can lead to serious health issues over time if inhaled leading to approximately 4 million premature deaths each year. The formation of these toxic substances can be mitigated, in part, through the introduction of increased turbulence intensity allowing for the so-called “well-stirred combustion regime”. Here we will be exploring the health, environmental, and social effects of biomass combustion in the developing world, the benefits of “rocket” technology for cooking and agricultural purposes, the potential implementation of well-stirred combustion regimes to further improve upon this technology, and how improved tending practices can increase thermal efficiency for both 3 stone cookstove and clean cookstove use.

Permission Statement

This item is protected by copyright law (Title 17, U.S. Code) and may only be used for noncommercial, educational, and scholarly purposes

Disciplines

Aerospace Engineering | Engineering | Mechanical Engineering


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