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Article Title

Editor's Page

Abstract

Volume 17 of the Basic Communication Course Annual offers a great deal of insight on the varied dimensions of basic course pedagogy which, at the end of the day, allows the basic course to embody the ideals of our discipline. The complexity of communication is best illustrated in Turman’s article exploring the use of technology in the basic course. As Paul explains, students’ perceptions of teacher immediacy and affect are influenced not only by gender, but also by the use of technology. Paul’s findings show us that the classroom communication environment must not be characterized with a “one approach fits all” mentality. Communication richness could be defined in a number of ways. As Marshall and Violanti show us, the use of online individual conferences dramatically improve students’ perceptions of the class while at the same time causing students to feel better prepared. Last, the humanity present in all human communication is revealed through three separate studies. Javette Hayes reminds us of the very human behavior of using symbols to resolve classroom conflict and other problematic behaviors; Rattenborg, Simonds, and Hunt provide all teachers with a shot v of humanity by taking us inside the minds of students as they prepare for classroom dialogue; and, Amy Rachelle Wolfsen helps us understand how students with varying levels of communication apprehension react to different forms of pedagogy. Of course, this division of articles between complexity, richness, and humanity is arbitrary, for each article illustrates, in some way, these fundamental characteristics of human communication. For that we should all admire and attempt to emulate these scholars.