English Faculty Publications

Title

Fundamental Gaffes

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

3-2007

Publication Source

Communication and Critical/Cultural Studies

Abstract

According to certain political analysts, George W. Bush won a second term because he built a "faith coalition" that featured Protestant fundamentalists and evangelicals, 78 percent of whom voted for him. Not surprisingly, Democrats have since been trying to figure out how to get some religion. Of course, despite the formal separation between church and state, religion has played an important role in American politics from the beginning. Still, as political sages from both sides of the aisle have pointed out, the especially active role among conservative Christians is unprecedented. For John Danforth, what is new is how "Republicans have transformed [the] party into the political arm of conservative Christians." For Jimmy Carter, what is new is the fundamentalist character of the religious voices in politics. Leaders among politically active conservative Christians are thrilled with the political clout that comes with this sort of analysis. Moreover, they are prepared to use it, as did James Dobson, fundamentalist and founder of Focus on Family, when he warned Republicans that if they did not deliver a ban on same-sex marriage, an end to abortion and embryonic stem-cell research, and a strictly constructionist Supreme Court, the party would "pay a price in four years."

Inclusive pages

98-101

ISBN/ISSN

1479-1420

Comments

Permission documentation is on file.

Publisher

Taylor and Francis

Volume

4

Issue

1

Peer Reviewed

yes