Title

Insights into Regeneration Tool Box: An Animal Approach

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

9-2019

Publication Source

Developmental Biology

Abstract

For ages, regeneration has intrigued countless biologists, clinicians, and biomedical engineers. In recent years, significant progress made in identification and characterization of a regeneration tool kit has helped the scientific community to understand the mechanism(s) involved in regeneration across animal kingdom. These mechanistic insights revealed that evolutionarily conserved pathways like Wnt, Notch, Hedgehog, BMP, and JAK/STAT are involved in regeneration. Furthermore, advancement in high throughput screening approaches like transcriptomic analysis followed by proteomic validations have discovered many novel genes, and regeneration specific enhancers that are specific to highly regenerative species like Hydra, Planaria, Newts, and Zebrafish. Since genetic machinery is highly conserved across the animal kingdom, it is possible to engineer these genes and regeneration specific enhancers in species with limited regeneration properties like Drosophila, and mammals. Since these models are highly versatile and genetically tractable, cross-species comparative studies can generate mechanistic insights in regeneration for animals with long gestation periods e.g. Newts. In addition, it will allow extrapolation of regenerative capabilities from highly regenerative species to animals with low regeneration potential, e.g. mammals. In future, these studies, along with advancement in tissue engineering applications, can have strong implications in the field of regenerative medicine and stem cell biology.

Inclusive pages

111-129

ISBN/ISSN

0012-1606

Comments

The authors thank Dr. Katia Del Rio-Tsonis, Dr. Madhuri Kango-Singh, Dr. Deepika K. Sodhi, and Aditi Singh for critical comments on the manuscript. ASM is supported by the Graduate Program in Biology. This work and AS is supported by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)-1R15GM124654-01, Schuellein Endowment Fund, STEM Catalyst Grant from the University of Dayton and start-up support from the University of Dayton.

Publisher

Elsevier

Volume

453

Peer Reviewed

yes

Issue

2


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