Title of Presentation

Building Quality Multiple Choice Assessments

About the Presenter(s)

Hannah Jackson, instructional design specialist, Center for Online Learning

Location

Kennedy Union Room 207

Start Date

4-1-2023 1:10 PM

End Date

4-1-2023 2:00 PM

Abstract/Description

Although many formats of assessments have become widely available, the tried-and-true multiple-choice exam remains a mainstay. Its ease of grading makes it a convenient choice for instructors, and students are familiar with what it entails. How can instructors ensure that their multiple-choice assessments are written in a way that supports research-based data collection? What makes an assessment valid and reliable, and how can a multiple-choice question be both?

We must move into informing our instruction and collecting rich data through the creation of effective assessment that is still practical in this fast-paced academic world. I will share research-based methods to build multiple-choice assessments that are equipped to accurately measure student learning.

Goals for Attendees

1. Attendees will be able to write a multiple choice question by following research-based guidelines. 2. Attendees will be able to craft a valid and reliable assessment using multiple-choice questions. The idea of these goals are to equip instructors with the tools to build assessments that are quality and worthy of both their time and student's time. Attendees will discover how to use the tools they already have to create assessment that can hold its ground in the academic world while competing with an increasing strain on time and resources.

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COinS
 
Jan 4th, 1:10 PM Jan 4th, 2:00 PM

Building Quality Multiple Choice Assessments

Kennedy Union Room 207

Although many formats of assessments have become widely available, the tried-and-true multiple-choice exam remains a mainstay. Its ease of grading makes it a convenient choice for instructors, and students are familiar with what it entails. How can instructors ensure that their multiple-choice assessments are written in a way that supports research-based data collection? What makes an assessment valid and reliable, and how can a multiple-choice question be both?

We must move into informing our instruction and collecting rich data through the creation of effective assessment that is still practical in this fast-paced academic world. I will share research-based methods to build multiple-choice assessments that are equipped to accurately measure student learning.