Title of Presentation

Engaging in Community: Shared Institutional and Individual Values

About the Presenter(s)

Molly Malany Sayre, Assistant Professor of Social Work, Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work

Castel V. Sweet, Director of Community Engagement and Assistant Professor of Practice in Community Engagement, Office of Diversity and Community Engagement

Location

Kennedy Union Room 312

Start Date

4-1-2023 1:10 PM

End Date

4-1-2023 2:00 PM

Abstract/Description

“Community” is a pervasive concept at the University of Dayton. As such, it was unknown how students who enrolled in UD community-engaged learning (CEL) courses differed from their peers in demographic characteristics, previous experiential learning, and views of community engagement. Findings can inform CEL recruitment as well as evaluation of CEL outcomes, especially at institutions with a similar values orientation. This mixed-methods study indicates that among four semesters of students in three selected CEL courses, few differences were found with students in non-CEL control groups. One significant difference found was in racial identity: fewer students with nonwhite racial identities enrolled in CEL courses than control groups. These findings illustrate the need for diversity and inclusion strategies to be applied to student recruitment for CEL courses. Further, among students who already share the value of community engagement, how can we have an integrated curriculum that prepares them for a future in civic leadership and community building?

Goals for Attendees

1. Consider shared values related to community engagement among UD students who participated in the study. 2. Imagine institutional opportunities in terms of curriculum, given our findings of shared values. 3. Reflect on interventions to address racial disparities in enrollment in selected CEL courses.

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Jan 4th, 1:10 PM Jan 4th, 2:00 PM

Engaging in Community: Shared Institutional and Individual Values

Kennedy Union Room 312

“Community” is a pervasive concept at the University of Dayton. As such, it was unknown how students who enrolled in UD community-engaged learning (CEL) courses differed from their peers in demographic characteristics, previous experiential learning, and views of community engagement. Findings can inform CEL recruitment as well as evaluation of CEL outcomes, especially at institutions with a similar values orientation. This mixed-methods study indicates that among four semesters of students in three selected CEL courses, few differences were found with students in non-CEL control groups. One significant difference found was in racial identity: fewer students with nonwhite racial identities enrolled in CEL courses than control groups. These findings illustrate the need for diversity and inclusion strategies to be applied to student recruitment for CEL courses. Further, among students who already share the value of community engagement, how can we have an integrated curriculum that prepares them for a future in civic leadership and community building?