Case Studies in Human Rights Activism

Presenter/Author Information

James C. Franklin, Ohio Wesleyan University

Location

University of Dayton

Start Date

10-2-2015 4:00 PM

End Date

10-2-2015 5:30 PM

Abstract

The basis of this paper is research I have conducted into protests in Latin America. By recording the demands and actors involved in protests, I have been able to assess human rights-related protests. This, in turn, allows a systematic investigation of the relationship between social movements and human rights. One principal finding is that there are two different types of human rights contention. Argentina and Guatemala experienced national human rights movements, led by human rights organizations and focused on general human rights problems and solutions.

The other countries I studied in the region (Brazil, Chile, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Venezuela) experienced a different pattern that I call ancillary human rights protest. Here, human rights protests are led by a variety of organizations, focus on repression particular to the groups involved, and are either short-lived or part of a more general wave of opposition. This paper will build on these findings, considering the outcomes of human rights protests and movements, the role of transnational networks, and the complex relationships between social movements and human rights in Latin America and beyond.

Comments

This biennial conference provides a unique space for scholars, practitioners and advocates to engage in collaboration, dialogue and critical analysis of human rights advocacy — locally and globally. Learn more about the Human Rights Center at the University of Dayton >>>.

 
Oct 2nd, 4:00 PM Oct 2nd, 5:30 PM

Social Movements, Protest, and Human Rights: Latin America and Beyond (abstract)

University of Dayton

The basis of this paper is research I have conducted into protests in Latin America. By recording the demands and actors involved in protests, I have been able to assess human rights-related protests. This, in turn, allows a systematic investigation of the relationship between social movements and human rights. One principal finding is that there are two different types of human rights contention. Argentina and Guatemala experienced national human rights movements, led by human rights organizations and focused on general human rights problems and solutions.

The other countries I studied in the region (Brazil, Chile, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Venezuela) experienced a different pattern that I call ancillary human rights protest. Here, human rights protests are led by a variety of organizations, focus on repression particular to the groups involved, and are either short-lived or part of a more general wave of opposition. This paper will build on these findings, considering the outcomes of human rights protests and movements, the role of transnational networks, and the complex relationships between social movements and human rights in Latin America and beyond.