Humanitarian Concerns

Location

University of Dayton

Start Date

10-2-2015 2:15 PM

End Date

10-2-2015 3:45 PM

Abstract

The plight of Syrian, Iraqi, and Palestinian refugees in Lebanon was been well documented in recent years. Less attention has been paid to the impact these large refugee populations have had on the already marginalized regions in the northern (Akkar), eastern (Bakaa), and southern (Tyre & Nabatiye) parts of the country. Basic human rights such as education, health care, childhood development, family, employment, and equal protection before the law are being undermined through the ‘double burden’ of a largely unregulated and under-serviced refugee population, which is now threatening to exceed 2 million by the end of 2015.

This paper will deal with the nexus of refugee rights and the rights of impoverished populations in the marginalized regions of Lebanon. It will focus on the possibility of conceptualizing a comprehensive strategy, which takes the emergency needs of the newly arrived Syrians, as well as the already partially integrated Iraqi and Palestinian refugees into consideration, while simultaneously promoting the medium and long term economic and infrastructural development of the above mentioned peripheral parts of the country.

This paper will focus on the Akkar region in the far north of Lebanon. From a theoretical perspective, it will argue that the developmental agenda inherent in Catholic Social Teaching offers Lebanon a rational for a revitalization of the country, based on the experience of modernization in the 1950s and 1960s, often referred to as Chehabism (after the Maronite president at the time), and exemplified in the reform proposals developed by Louis-Joseph Lebret and the 1964 IRFED project report for Lebanon.

The original research to be presented in this paper will be drawn from projects carried out by this author, together with the staff at the Lebanese Emigration Research Center and in the Faculty of Law and Political Sciences, both at Notre Dame University, during the past four years.

Comments

This biennial conference provides a unique space for scholars, practitioners and advocates to engage in collaboration, dialogue and critical analysis of human rights advocacy — locally and globally. Learn more about the Human Rights Center at the University of Dayton >>>.

 
Oct 2nd, 2:15 PM Oct 2nd, 3:45 PM

Double Jeopardy: The Rights of Refugees in Marginalized Communities in the Middle East (abstract)

University of Dayton

The plight of Syrian, Iraqi, and Palestinian refugees in Lebanon was been well documented in recent years. Less attention has been paid to the impact these large refugee populations have had on the already marginalized regions in the northern (Akkar), eastern (Bakaa), and southern (Tyre & Nabatiye) parts of the country. Basic human rights such as education, health care, childhood development, family, employment, and equal protection before the law are being undermined through the ‘double burden’ of a largely unregulated and under-serviced refugee population, which is now threatening to exceed 2 million by the end of 2015.

This paper will deal with the nexus of refugee rights and the rights of impoverished populations in the marginalized regions of Lebanon. It will focus on the possibility of conceptualizing a comprehensive strategy, which takes the emergency needs of the newly arrived Syrians, as well as the already partially integrated Iraqi and Palestinian refugees into consideration, while simultaneously promoting the medium and long term economic and infrastructural development of the above mentioned peripheral parts of the country.

This paper will focus on the Akkar region in the far north of Lebanon. From a theoretical perspective, it will argue that the developmental agenda inherent in Catholic Social Teaching offers Lebanon a rational for a revitalization of the country, based on the experience of modernization in the 1950s and 1960s, often referred to as Chehabism (after the Maronite president at the time), and exemplified in the reform proposals developed by Louis-Joseph Lebret and the 1964 IRFED project report for Lebanon.

The original research to be presented in this paper will be drawn from projects carried out by this author, together with the staff at the Lebanese Emigration Research Center and in the Faculty of Law and Political Sciences, both at Notre Dame University, during the past four years.