Media and the Digital Age

Presenter/Author Information

Jennifer Grubbs, American University

Location

University of Dayton

Start Date

10-2-2015 4:00 PM

End Date

10-2-2015 5:30 PM

Abstract

The following paper will examine the ways in which digital media is used by both activists engaged in struggles of inequity as well as the State. Specifically, the paper focuses on the use of digital media in the antiracist organizing following the murders of Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Florida, Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri and Eric Garner in Staten Island, New York. Activists relied on digital media to share information, narratives, as well as create networks for mobilization. The State relied on digital media to provide counter-narratives and promulgate a fear-based rhetoric depicting activists as “looters.”

This paper emphasizes the potentiality of power in utilizing digital media as a way to challenge human rights violations in the U.S. Through an Athusserian lens; this analysis interrogates the process of subject formation within the digitized terrain in which citizenship is made possible through the performance of patriotism and dissent through digital media. Ultimately, human rights advocates must ask themselves if and how violent power can be recapitulated through digital democracies or if the revolution, ultimately, will not be tweeted.

Comments

This biennial conference provides a unique space for scholars, practitioners and advocates to engage in collaboration, dialogue and critical analysis of human rights advocacy — locally and globally. Learn more about the Human Rights Center at the University of Dayton >>>.

 
Oct 2nd, 4:00 PM Oct 2nd, 5:30 PM

The Potentiality of a Digital Revolution: Alienated Activists and the Surveillance State (abstract)

University of Dayton

The following paper will examine the ways in which digital media is used by both activists engaged in struggles of inequity as well as the State. Specifically, the paper focuses on the use of digital media in the antiracist organizing following the murders of Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Florida, Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri and Eric Garner in Staten Island, New York. Activists relied on digital media to share information, narratives, as well as create networks for mobilization. The State relied on digital media to provide counter-narratives and promulgate a fear-based rhetoric depicting activists as “looters.”

This paper emphasizes the potentiality of power in utilizing digital media as a way to challenge human rights violations in the U.S. Through an Athusserian lens; this analysis interrogates the process of subject formation within the digitized terrain in which citizenship is made possible through the performance of patriotism and dissent through digital media. Ultimately, human rights advocates must ask themselves if and how violent power can be recapitulated through digital democracies or if the revolution, ultimately, will not be tweeted.