Roundtable — Teaching Human Rights Inside and Outside the Classroom: Education Without Borders

Location

University of Dayton

Start Date

10-2-2015 2:15 PM

End Date

10-2-2015 3:45 PM

Abstract

University courses addressing various human rights issues have grown exponentially at the undergraduate and graduate levels over the past 20 years. Most of these courses focus on specific issues and many programs require fieldwork and/or internships. In addition, the use of the international human rights language is increasingly integrated into professional training programs that are often labeled “social” issues; for example, labor, immigration or domestic violence. What is lacking, despite the resonance and inclusion of human rights issues in these and other areas, is the development of comprehensive human rights methods and ethics courses.

This roundtable seeks to bring together people engaged in human rights scholarship, teaching and training to explore the particular skills that are needed to do theoretical and applied research on human rights, human rights violations and advocacy. It will also discuss the ethics and methods of human rights work and, in so doing, will address the consequences of doing such research poorly.

The roundtable thus aims to expand the understanding of human rights education beyond issue and content to specifically address the question of how do we do intellectually robust and reflexive human rights scholarship that works to make things better in the world?

As Indigenous scholarship has taught us, good research must be evaluated on the basis of respect, reciprocity, relevance and responsibility by recognizing the ethics that are involved in doing such work. Thus, the roundtable aims to work towards developing a conversation around the methods of human rights academic and applied academic work. In this way one can develop best practices as well note concerns in current practice.

Comments

This biennial conference provides a unique space for scholars, practitioners and advocates to engage in collaboration, dialogue and critical analysis of human rights advocacy — locally and globally. Learn more about the Human Rights Center at the University of Dayton >>>.

 
Oct 2nd, 2:15 PM Oct 2nd, 3:45 PM

Teaching Human Rights Inside and Outside the Classroom: Education Without Borders (abstract)

University of Dayton

University courses addressing various human rights issues have grown exponentially at the undergraduate and graduate levels over the past 20 years. Most of these courses focus on specific issues and many programs require fieldwork and/or internships. In addition, the use of the international human rights language is increasingly integrated into professional training programs that are often labeled “social” issues; for example, labor, immigration or domestic violence. What is lacking, despite the resonance and inclusion of human rights issues in these and other areas, is the development of comprehensive human rights methods and ethics courses.

This roundtable seeks to bring together people engaged in human rights scholarship, teaching and training to explore the particular skills that are needed to do theoretical and applied research on human rights, human rights violations and advocacy. It will also discuss the ethics and methods of human rights work and, in so doing, will address the consequences of doing such research poorly.

The roundtable thus aims to expand the understanding of human rights education beyond issue and content to specifically address the question of how do we do intellectually robust and reflexive human rights scholarship that works to make things better in the world?

As Indigenous scholarship has taught us, good research must be evaluated on the basis of respect, reciprocity, relevance and responsibility by recognizing the ethics that are involved in doing such work. Thus, the roundtable aims to work towards developing a conversation around the methods of human rights academic and applied academic work. In this way one can develop best practices as well note concerns in current practice.