Presentation/Proposal Title

Heightening the Effectiveness of Instructing ESL Graduate Writers

Presenter Information

Heather ThurmanFollow

Type of Presentation/Proposal

Individual Presentation or Paper

Start Date

5-4-2019 4:30 PM

End Date

5-4-2019 5:30 PM

Keywords

Graduate Students, ESL, Guiding vs. Editing

Description

A common issue found in writing centers is the question of how to appropriately guide graduate ESL students through their projects effectively without compromising on the instructor’s methods. The writing center is a place of specific expectations, both from the instructor and writer. However, often is the case where students, particularly ESL graduate students, find themselves in need of an editor and not a guide for revisions. This occurrence can cause issues between instructor and writer, which in turn creates an ineffective session at the writing center and subsequent loss of graduate ESL writers visiting the center.

My project aims at resolving this common issue within writing centers. One of the most important aspects of helping graduate ESL students understand the importance, and role, of the writing center lies outside of the center itself. Introducing graduate students to the ways in which the center provides assistance, not editing, before their visits relies on the help of advisers, professors, and instructors to support the ESL student. If writing centers are able to interact more effectively with those roles of authority, I believe the graduate student, and subsequently the instructor, will benefit from a more inspiring and heightened form of guidance in the writing center.

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Apr 5th, 4:30 PM Apr 5th, 5:30 PM

Heightening the Effectiveness of Instructing ESL Graduate Writers

M2320

A common issue found in writing centers is the question of how to appropriately guide graduate ESL students through their projects effectively without compromising on the instructor’s methods. The writing center is a place of specific expectations, both from the instructor and writer. However, often is the case where students, particularly ESL graduate students, find themselves in need of an editor and not a guide for revisions. This occurrence can cause issues between instructor and writer, which in turn creates an ineffective session at the writing center and subsequent loss of graduate ESL writers visiting the center.

My project aims at resolving this common issue within writing centers. One of the most important aspects of helping graduate ESL students understand the importance, and role, of the writing center lies outside of the center itself. Introducing graduate students to the ways in which the center provides assistance, not editing, before their visits relies on the help of advisers, professors, and instructors to support the ESL student. If writing centers are able to interact more effectively with those roles of authority, I believe the graduate student, and subsequently the instructor, will benefit from a more inspiring and heightened form of guidance in the writing center.