Presentation/Proposal Title

Homographs: Engaging Second Language Learners in Collaborative Writing Practices

Type of Presentation/Proposal

Individual Presentation or Paper

Start Date

6-4-2019 10:00 AM

End Date

6-4-2019 11:00 AM

Description

A common obstacle I have observed while working in writing centers is when I work with second language learners. They often mix up a word with a different context, which is common for students who, English is not their first language. A student may understand the meaning of a word in only one context, without recognizing that the same word may have more than one meaning. The good news is there are ways to prevent this mix up through understanding homographs, which are words that are spelled the same, but have entirely different meanings and can also sound different when read out loud.

To help prevent students from struggling with the meaning of language, I will introduce the multiple meanings of words through a collaborative writing activity, which in turn will expand vocabulary which is not limited to just second language learners; this helps to differentiate the words from their other meanings. Participants will write in groups, and no one story will be the same. Dylan B. Dryer writes about language and discusses how words give meaning to other words. Other scholars, such as as Julie Jacobson, Diane Lapp, and James Flood do linguistic work with ESL students in this field. We all have the same goal; we want to help our students to become better writers. My objective is to incorporate these exercises into everyday consultation practices with students to help them understand reading and writing on a college level.

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Apr 6th, 10:00 AM Apr 6th, 11:00 AM

Homographs: Engaging Second Language Learners in Collaborative Writing Practices

M2320

A common obstacle I have observed while working in writing centers is when I work with second language learners. They often mix up a word with a different context, which is common for students who, English is not their first language. A student may understand the meaning of a word in only one context, without recognizing that the same word may have more than one meaning. The good news is there are ways to prevent this mix up through understanding homographs, which are words that are spelled the same, but have entirely different meanings and can also sound different when read out loud.

To help prevent students from struggling with the meaning of language, I will introduce the multiple meanings of words through a collaborative writing activity, which in turn will expand vocabulary which is not limited to just second language learners; this helps to differentiate the words from their other meanings. Participants will write in groups, and no one story will be the same. Dylan B. Dryer writes about language and discusses how words give meaning to other words. Other scholars, such as as Julie Jacobson, Diane Lapp, and James Flood do linguistic work with ESL students in this field. We all have the same goal; we want to help our students to become better writers. My objective is to incorporate these exercises into everyday consultation practices with students to help them understand reading and writing on a college level.